SoFA Design Institute Editorial Competition

by Fashion Revolution Philippines 8 months ago
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OVERVIEW: 

In February, we were invited to lecture a class about the growing Slow Fashion movement and Fashion Revolution in Mrs. Nela’s  Fashion Trends Class. We gave the class an editorial competition. The task was to create artwork we can feature in our social media in the run up to Fashion Revolution Week, 24th-30th April using the knowledge they have gained from the lecture and/or drawing inspiration our existing assets, which can be downloaded from our website.

There were five groups. We have chosen one artwork for each group to be the top five, including one winning image. Feel free to share the artworks crediting the group and using the caption they have written. Let us start with the Top 5 followed by the winning group – Group 3, then the rest of the team.

 


TOP 5

Group 3
Winning Image: LOOK01-MONEYPOWERFASHION

We wanted to portray the perception of society on Fashion as something glitzy and glamorous. In contrast, we want to show the reality and trust cost of Fashion.

On the left side, the people standing represent the society/consumers turning a blind eye on the truth. Whilst on the right side, you’ll see two women all dolled up acting as a sweatshop sewer with their mouth covered in duct tape to show how vulnerable they are in their work. Their wardrobe also represents how our knowledge about them can be quite shallow and superficial since we barely know about them.


GROUP 1

Anyone could be a fashion revolutionary!

Presenting excerpts from HOW TO BE A FASHION REVOLUTIONARY and the FASHION REVOLUTION FANZINE

“Rent. Swap. Buy second hand and vintage pieces.”

Swap instead of shopping and it costs nothing! Rent a gown you’ll only ever use once! Buy second hand and vintage pieces that you’ll wear forever.

And with that you have:

>de-cluttered your closet

>saved natural resources

>reduced waste by not sending clothes to landfills closing the cycle

>became a fashion revolutionary!

Be curious, Ask #whomademyclothes

Find out, become a fashion detective!

And last but not the least DO SOMETHING!­

@fash_rev #fashionrevolution #fashionrevolutionary #haulternative

 


GROUP 2

Minimize Determined Waste

When clothes are made, it is inevitable that there will be leftover fabrics and threads, but these don’t necessarily have to go straight to the waste can. The same goes for ripped, damaged clothes. While they may be torn apart or in pieces, we have the capacity to combine these mismatched patches of fabric into something both stylish and of use in our daily life. Minimizing the waste we produce whether out of creative endeavors or style habits is also part of managing our personal impact on the waste disposal system and the environment.

 


GROUP 4

WhoMadeMyClothes


GROUP 5

The colours and use of shadow and light in this image portray the darker side of fashion and reflect Alexander McQueen’s message that fashion should be a positive force in the world and not a negative. It should add to and enhance our lives and not be a source of imprisonment for anybody, it should not be a nameless, faceless entity who makes our clothes, there should be transparency and clarity in the industry.


ALL ENTRIES 

WINNER: GROUP 3

Dominique Dy – @dydmnq
Ethan Correos – @mxindigo
Trixie Platon – @trixieplaton
Phuong Do – @pidisabadgirlinabadworld
Chris Nick Delos Reyes – @chrisnickd

 

In here we wanted to show how basic piece of garment can be used in multiple ways of style and still look fashionable. In retrospect, this is our take on what Vivienne Westwood said, “Buy less, Choose Well”.

Purchasing a garment that has great quality is like an investment since it last longer than your usual purchase from fast fashion retailers.

 

In here we gathered all our peers and invited them to join us in taking this photo while wearing something of their own that is sustainable. As Fashion Students, being educated in this matter would not only promote the cause but with the knowledge of this concept will bring us into more creating sustainable clothing.


GROUP 1

Raine Eugenio – @raiiiine
Farah Zavala – @furrrrah
Mark Escauso – @markesumsa
April Toledo – @kwina

 

Anyone could be a fashion revolutionary!

Presenting excerpts from HOW TO BE A FASHION REVOLUTIONARY and the FASHION REVOLUTION FANZINE

“Mend. Make and Customize. Because we value the people who make it.”

In the world of ethical and sustainable fashion, the mantra is buy less and buy better. Cultivating a relationship with your clothing is an investment that directly connects the grower with the maker and the wearer. Repairing is an extension of that sentiment, and a deepening of the relationship through wear, and repair, and the honoring of all the embedded stories that led to it. Making and customizing clothing from unused clothing and giving it life gives the clothing a new purpose.

Don’t dump it, repair it! Pick up a needle and fix it by yourself or ask your grandma to sew it for you. Developing relationships with your clothing and your surroundings makes the life cycle of clothing more long-lasting and meaningful.

Be curious, Ask #whomademyclothes

Find out, become a fashion detective!

And last but not the least DO SOMETHING!­

@fash_rev #fashionrevolution #fashionrevolutionary #haulternative

 

Anyone could be a fashion revolutionary!

Presenting excerpts from HOW TO BE A FASHION REVOLUTIONARY and the FASHION REVOLUTION FANZINE

“Express. Recycle. Be a craftivist! Waste isn’t waste waste until you waste it.”

Express yourself through your passion and be creative. An example would be like recycling plastic and making it into flowers like this dress! “Be a craftivist. Use craft as a tool for gentle protest. Get others involved and “change the world one stitch at a time”

Be curious, Ask #whomademyclothes

Find out, become a fashion detective!

And last but not the least DO SOMETHING!­

@fash_rev #fashionrevolution #fashionrevolutionary #haulternative


GROUP 2 

Zoila Gerente
Via Sarmiento
Kim Moonyeen Te
Selina De Leon

 

Renew The Sentiment

The term wardrobe makeover almost always calls shopping to mind. Shopping for new things has become a widely promoted, deeply inculcated culture in today’s society, such that we do it not only when we need to, but also to satisfy emotional, social or psychological issues. We were promised a sense of renewal, a new experience, whenever we acquire new objects. We might feel obligated to turn to shopping to feel a sense of change or progress, when in fact our choices don’t have to be limited to the mall. The exchange and passing on of clothes could extend its lifecycle, find relevance in someone else’s closet and foster its own sort of sentimental narrative as it continues on through many owners. This campaign revolves around renewing sentiment for clothes, to make us care for them again.

 

Disrupt The Disconnect


There is a need to reassess the relations between clothes and people in this technological era that creates a culture of disengagement. With today’s fast-paced world, convenience is easily the priority and its accessibility the platform to an increasingly disconnected, incapacitated consumer society. There has been a great loss of material sentimentality as people were encouraged to blindly consider things they have as disposable commodities once they go out of trend, when in fact this doesn’t have to be the case. We determine the value of the things we have, and it is within our power to make them last.


GROUP 4 
Selena Venturanza- @slnav
Tricia Mercado- @triciamerc
Gabriela Quijencio- @fabgabq
Em-J Uson- @emjuson
Cates Doromal- @catesdoromal
Nicolo Perez- @nicoloperez

 


GROUP 5
Karolyn Rath (@karorath, FB- Karolyn Rath)
Swanger Bendong (@swangersingh, FB- Sshwanger Stalwart)
Nikki Pamatmat (FB- Nikki Coleen Pamatmat)
Lexy Mendoza

The bright colours draw our attention to the message to Be curious and as it is something that is literally tattooed across the face it is a message that cannot and should not be missed and should be seen by everyone. This is a reminder to us to Be Curious and ask questions about where our clothes come from and who makes them. We should own our curiosity and it should become a part of us.

 

In this image the message is a positive one from Mahatma Ghandi who said “Be the change you want to see in the world”. This image reminds us that we should ask “Who made my clothes?” in particular during fashion revolution week. The change begins with us one question and label at a time, the revolution begins with us for “We are the Revolution!”

 

In this image we ask What the true cost of fast fashion? The label goes beyond the rice tag and shows an image of waste being dumped at a landfill, just one of the many problems that the fast fashion industry is responsible for contributing greatly to in the world. The image aims to make the viewer think beyond the garment to really question what is the cost of the items that they purchase.

 

In this image the figures are hidden in the background and remain faceless while the woman modelling the clothes is visible to the world. The message in the photograph is that the people who wear the clothes have the power to change the world in many different ways including for the women who are a part of the process of making them.

 

Here are the photos from the lecture:

 

SHOUT OUT TO: 

Mrs. Nela – SoFA Design Institute Professor

Hazel Roldan – Student Ambssador, SoFA Design Institute

Anissa Gomez – FRPhilippines Social Media intern


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